CDC - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  NIDDK - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

NDEP is a partnership of the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and more than 200 public and private organizations.

You are here: NDEP Home>What's New

What’s New RSS Feed  Help with RSS


April Partner Spotlight

The SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium Uses NDEP Resources to Raise Awareness of Diabetes in American Indians and Alaska Natives

The National Kidney Disease Education Program Background

The SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium (SEARHC) is a non-profit tribal health consortium of 18 Native communities which serve the health interests of the Tlingit, Haida, Tsimshian, and other Native people of Southeast Alaska. SEARHC’s vision is to improve the health status of Native people in Southeast Alaska and other partners to the highest possible level. SEARHC is also a 2011 ADA John Pipe Voices for Change award recipient for its advocacy work for effective diabetes treatment and prevention services in American Indian and Alaska Native communities.

Outreach and Promotions

SEARHC, incorporates the National Diabetes Education Program’s (NDEP) diabetes education materials – such as Your Game Plan to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes, We Have the Power to Prevent Diabetes, and 4 Steps to Manage Your Diabetes for Life – in its “Know Your Numbers” campaign. The National Kidney Disease Education Program The campaign targets health care professionals, people with diabetes, and people at risk for diabetes, with messages about understanding blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol levels to prevent and manage diabetes.

Maybelle Filler, Diabetes Grants Department Manager at SEARHC explained, “We look to the NDEP for information because the program provides content that is easy to use and understand and is tailored for our audiences. I don’t have to worry about the credibility of the information because it is up-to-date and research based.”

Campaign outreach involves inserting monthly columns in local newspapers using NDEP messages and content. The columns promote the “Know Your Numbers” tagline, information about target blood pressure, A1C and cholesterol goals, as well as tips for healthy eating and getting active.

Additionally, SEARHC inserts NDEP’s Diabetes Risk Test into local newspapers during key observances such as American Heart Month and National Diabetes Month. SEARHC adapted the Diabetes Risk Test to include an invitation to see a local doctor if readers have questions or concerns, healthy eating tips, and a link to the NDEP website.

Results and Lessons Learned

SEARHC’s diabetes outreach success is due to finding the right motivators that work in the community to get people involved in diabetes prevention and management. Pictures and narratives from local residents receive the biggest impact in the community and are the best motivators for action.

For more information about the SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium contact Maybelle Filler at Maybelle.Filler@searhc.org or (907) 966-8739.


Bookmark and Share | Permalink

Tags: Partners


#JustOneStep Social Media Infocards

Are you using social media? The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) has infocards you can use on your Facebook and Twitter pages! Each month, the NDEP will share a new tip to help people take small steps for better health. For example, helpful tips include: "Turn up the music and jam while doing household chores, "Cook with a mix of spices instead of salt," and "Drink a glass of water 10 minutes before lunch so you feel less hungry."

Click here to check out the infocards, and don’t forget to check this page each month for new infocards you can use.


Bookmark and Share | Permalink

Tags: Partners


Diabetes Alert Day

American Diabetes Association Alert Day®, observed annually on the fourth Tuesday in March – Tuesday, March 25, 2014 – is a one-day wake-up call to inform the American public about the seriousness of diabetes, particularly when diabetes is left undiagnosed or untreated.

In observance of Diabetes Alert Day, the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) is encouraging people to take the Diabetes Risk Test and know their risk for type 2 diabetes. If left undiagnosed or untreated, diabetes can lead to serious health problems including heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease, amputation, and even death.

Visit www.YourDiabetesInfo.org/AlertDay2014 to find the Diabetes Risk Test and other resources you can use to support your Diabetes Alert Day efforts.


Bookmark and Share | Permalink

Tags: Partners


March Partner Spotlight

The National Kidney Disease Education Program Showcases NDEP Materials in its Annual Kidney Sundays Event

The National Kidney Disease Education Program Background

The National Kidney Disease Education Program (NKDEP) is a federally sponsored program that works to reduce the burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among communities most impacted by the disease. Established in 2000 by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), NKDEP aims to raise awareness among people at risk for CKD about the need for testing and educate people with CKD about how to manage their disease.

Outreach and Promotions

NKDEP uses the National Diabetes Education Program’s (NDEP) messages and materials as part of its Kidney Sundays public awareness event, which was developed to educate African Americans about kidney disease and its key risk factors, like diabetes and high blood pressure. The National Kidney Disease Education Program African Americans are a critical audience for kidney health messages because they are almost four times as likely as Caucasians to develop kidney failure.

Kidney Sundays leverages the growing tendency for African Americans to turn to places of worship to get accurate, useful information by bringing kidney health messages to the faith community. Because high rates of diabetes among African Americans contributes to their elevated kidney failure risk, messages about diabetes prevention and control are central to the Kidney Sundays program. Undiagnosed or untreated diabetes is a major cause of CKD. However, by managing diabetes, African Americans can lower their risk for CKD and other diabetes complications.

To help raise awareness of these diabetes messages, NKDEP distributes numerous NDEP materials, including 4 Steps to Manage Your Diabetes for Life, Choose More than 50 Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes, Did You Have Gestational Diabetes When You Were Pregnant? What You Need to Know, and more, to more than 85 participating places of worship. Additionally, NKDEP and NDEP collaborate to promote the Kidney Sundays event through a variety of channels. NKDEP posts messages about the event and related partner materials, including NDEP’s, on its Make the Kidney Connection Facebook page, and NDEP shares Kidney Sundays information through its Facebook page, Twitter feed, and News & Notes partner e-newsletter.

On March 2, 2014, in recognition of National Kidney Month, the National Kidney Disease Education program hosted its third annual Kidney Sundays event at more than 85 places of worship across the country.

Results and Lessons Learned

Kidney Sundays events in 2012 and 2013 engaged more than 420 African American faith communities across the country, reaching more than 335,000 congregants, to dedicate a day to talk about kidney health, diabetes, and high blood pressure. Over 6,000 blood pressure screenings were conducted and more than 200 people were referred to local area diabetes prevention and control programs for further evaluation. The Kidney Sundays events have supported the distribution of 130,000 kidney health-related materials from NKDEP and other NIDDK programs, including nearly 25,000 NDEP materials in 2013 alone.

For more information about the National Kidney Disease Education Program’s activities, contact Eileen Newman at newmaneileen@niddk.nih.gov.


Bookmark and Share | Permalink

Tags: Partners


Take Care of Your Heart. Manage Your Diabetes. Syndicated Content

Share NDEP’s tip sheet on your website to raise awareness about diabetes and heart health.

February is American Heart Month and 2 out of 3 people with diabetes die of heart disease or stroke. Research has shown that people with diabetes can lower their risk for heart disease by managing the ABCs of diabetes—A1C, Blood Pressure, Cholesterol—and stopping smoking.

Spread the word by using NDEP’s new content syndication feature, which allows you to easily share NDEP’s Take Care of Your Heart. Manage Your Diabetes content on your website.

Visit www.YourDiabetesInfo.org/Heart for additional resources you can use to help people with diabetes know that taking care of their diabetes can prevent heart problems.


Bookmark and Share | Permalink

Tags: Partners


< Older Entries 

Archives
Latest Entries
Tags